Mohawk Hairstyles For Men – Haircut Pictures Gallery

Mohawk Hair

Mohawk hairstyle. Russell Mitchell, a bike builder, with his distinctive mohawk hair.


 

The Mohawk hairstyle can be found through out history. It is most related to the Native American Mohawk Indian tribe, however, there have also been discovered, the remains of mummies, thousands of years old, sporting Mohawks.

The punk rock movement of the early eighties is accredited for the popularity of the Mohawk. It was seen as a symbol of rebelling against authority, which is what the basis of punk was, rebelling against all types of authority, social and political. In recent times, the Mohawk has again appeared on the scene, however, this time, it knows no boundaries.

Varieties of Mohawk Hairstyles

This hairstyle adds flair to anyone brave enough to wear it. There are several different versions of the Mohawk, but the classic version is always a hit.

In the classic version of the Mohawk, the sides are shaved all the way up, leaving a strip down the middle of the head, usually approximately an inch wide. Some choose to have it stop at the crown, while others like for it to go all the way down to the nape of the neck.

The newest version of the classic Mohawk is the faux-hawk. In this version, the sides are not shaved completely, usually done using a two guard on the clippers, and blended up. Then the top is cut in an angled fashion, so as the wearer can gel the center up, with the sides coming in to form the ridge of the “hawk”. This style is good for business people, who like the style of the Mohawk, but can’t necessarily wear it to work. All types of people are wearing this hairstyle, from rockers to bankers, and rebels to state troopers. Men, women, boys, and yes, even girls…. babies too! It’s everywhere you turn. The faux-hawk can be worn down, in the “Caesar cut” style, or in a messy spike style.

Baby faux-hawk.

Baby with a faux-hawk.


There are more variations of Mohawk such as, Bihawk (two strip of long hair with shaved portions between), Trihawk (three strip of long hair with shaved portions between), Reverse Mohawk (the opposite of a Mohawk), Fanned Mohawk (resemble a fan mohawk), Frohawk (African-American/Afro mohawk), Liberty Spikes (look like the spikes on the Statue of Liberty’s crown), Dreadhawk (dreadlocks-mohawk), etc.

How to Make a Mohawk

Once you have gotten the Mohawk style that you like, the maintenance can be fairly intense. You will need to have the sides shaved on a regular basis, and be sure to keep those lines clean, or you will end up with a much thinner version, or even a crooked version of your original Mohawk. When you are styling your Mohawk, the easiest way to achieve the height you are looking for, is to dry with a blow-dryer using gel. Apply the gel on the hair closest to the scalp first, and work your way up. Using your blow-dryer and a comb, dry from the scalp out, this will help to create a foundation for your Mohawk. A hard-hold paste works very well for this, as it is already somewhat dry. Once you’ve got the Mohawk up, and in the desired shape, use a hard hold hairspray, preferably one that is humidity resistant with little to no water in it.